• Slider-1

    24/7

    Recovery centres

  • Slider-2

    24/7

    Recovery centres

     
  • Slider-3

    24/7

    Recovery centres

  • Slider-4

    24/7

    Recovery centres

Overview disasters

In the overview below you will find examples of incidents that occur in practice. If you have any questions reviewing the incidents? Call 088 - 26 46 000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


 

COIN calamities - fire

 

At a multinational, which has its European head office in the Netherlands and employs 150 staff, a fire breaks out during the night at one of the work stations (desk with computer and telephone). The fire rages on the second floor but fortunately it doesn’t take long before it’s noticed. The fire brigade is called out and, amongst other things, uses an aerial platform to fight the fire.

COIN calamities blackouts

 

When a power cut takes out a merchant bank’s dealing room, business-critical employees are moved as quickly as possible to the COIN recovery location. Normal activities can be continued almost uninterrupted at the dedicated work stations, where Bloomberg dealing room positions are always kept operational.

COIN calamities - fire

 

A business services provider sees their entire premises burn to the ground following a fire that started with a short-circuit in a coffee machine. All servers and data storage are destroyed in the process. At the COIN recovery location a mobile server rack is loaded with the client’s back-ups, allowing this client to be up and running again within 24 hours.

COIN calamities - network failure

 

An organisation’s network collapses. Despite this client having a twin data centre in place, it turns out the premises’ external network is not fully duplicated. The client moves over to COIN, as part of which the offices’ phone lines and Contact Centre are also switched across, enabling the client to be operational again within 1.5 hours and reachable by its customers.

COIN calamities - fire in restaurant

 

Smoke from a retail organisation’s staff restaurant sets off the alarm, causing the entire building – almost 1500 employees – to be evacuated. The emergency services arrive with full equipment. There are no injuries, but it will be hours before employees are able to return to their workstations. The employees finish their 'normal' working day at COIN.

COIN calamities - fire in restaurant

 

A multinational moves into new premises, where 3 weeks later fire breaks out in the power supply. All data, telephone and power cables need replacing. It will be several weeks before the multinational can move back into their new premises. In the meantime work goes on from the recovery location.

COIN calamities - excavation

 

A Dutch merchant bank has taken a number of precautions, with data connections duplicated and separately installed in the building. But the unexpected still happens both connections fail because of excavation work in the vicinity. Work resumes within a few hours from the COIN recovery location.

COIN calamities - other

 

A foreign organisation is taken on to deliver business continuity for the Dutch supervisory authority. COIN consultants are called in to identify those processes and resources - IT, telephony etc. – that are business critical. An external auditor compiles the report for the first recovery test, following which this organisation complies with the set requirements and guidelines.

COIN calamities - explosions

 

During work on a car manufacturer’s low voltage installation an explosion occurs. A medevac helicopter airlifts two employees to a hospital. The explosion resulted in a fire, with noxious fumes being released from burning PVC insulation. The cable space, together with the server room, is partially burned out. At the time, the manufacturer had no recovery option and was able to restore even limited operations only after several weeks. Premises were quickly found, but achieving data connectivity took the most time.

COIN calamities - water damage

At the office where the annual accounts were being drawn up, the sprinkler system starts deluging water . Employees run from the building, but cannot prevent the documentation in the open filing cabinets becoming drenched, together with the bookkeeping on the desks. Before the mains shut-down valve can be located the entire floor is sodden. COIN collected all the wet documentation, storing it in a special way to prevent further damage. It’s two months before the client can return to their own location, during which all work continues at the COIN recovery location where the organisation is reachable on its normal telephone numbers. In the meantime the documentation was dried and returned. The annual accounts could be finished (just) in time for publication to the stock market.

COIN calamities - water damage

 

At a financial services provider water floods into the parking garage beneath the building. The vehicles are got out in time. However, the surface within the garage starts to subside with large pot-holes appearing due to sand being washed away. A large hole appears at a supporting pillar, causing the building - over 1000 employees - to be evacuated. The COIN emergency number is called, heavy equipment being deployed meanwhile to locate the source.

COIN calamities - other

 

In a large insurance company’s building, the sewerage pipe in the garage bursts. Vehicles are moved outside and the fire services hose out the garage. However, the overpowering stench means no customers can be received and the company is temporarily re-located.

COIN calamities - nature

 

Heavy rainfall results in a short-circuit in the building next door to a large asset manager. Sparks erupt from the ground, and power to the area is cut shortly afterward. The COIN emergency number is called; phone numbers are switched through to the recovery location, workstations are provided with current PC-images and the Contact Centre’s employees can get back to work.

COIN calamities - water damage

 

During maintenance work water enters the telephony centre causing a short-circuit. As the supplier doesn’t hold this circuit board in stock, replacement is only possible after a number of days. As the organisation handles a lot of telephone traffic the decision is taken to relocate to the recovery location. Work continues from here.

COIN calamities - nature

 

Extreme weather results in exceptionally heavy rainfall. The down-pipes are unable to handle this volume of water, which overflows the edge of the roof along the façade. Eventually the sewer also overflows, water entering the server room and cutting the power supply. At the recovery location COIN provides both workstations and recovery servers, together with the client’s data.

COIN calamities - fire in restaurant

 

A fire affects a data centre of a large telecom provider, disabling most of the mobile phone traffic. Various organisations that are able to work from home are unreachable by mobile and these are particularly dependent on mobile phone services. As a result COIN’s Telephony-By-Pass (TBP) is activated, enabling these organisations to again be reachable.

COIN calamities - gas leaks

 

At a financial services provider, a strange smell results in employees becoming unwell. The building - with almost 1200 employees - is evacuated by the emergency services and ambulances take 15 people to hospital. Until the investigation is concluded and the problem resolved, work continues for several weeks at the recovery location.

COIN calamities - cyberattack

 

A cyber attack disrupts data centre traffic to the extent that all customers experience severe interruption. Access to servers and data becomes unacceptably sporadic. The client moves to our recovery location where they can access their second data centre.

COIN calamities - bomb threats

 

An individual in a railway station claims to have a bomb, threatening to explode it. The station is sealed tight, the immediate area being evacuated. The client has two office buildings that act as fall-backs for each other. Bomb disposal units call for the evacuation of a large area, which encompasses both buildings. The client moves to the COIN recovery location where it can continue its activities. Telephones are switched through enabling incoming calls to be answered by the Contact Centre.

COIN calamities - other

 

During an important meeting of world leaders in 2014 part of the city is cordoned off. Roads into and from the city are also closed, or have only limited access. Some COIN clients experience difficulties as a result, and use our recovery locations to ensure they can continue their business critical processes

COIN calamities - water damage

Rainwater starts to leak in to the Contact Centre, located in a high-rise office building. Initially only a few drips fall from the ceiling; waste bins are placed to catch them whilst the building management is called. The COIN emergency number is also called and the in-house emergency services evacuate the building. Water comes in faster, the ceiling becoming soaked. The water cascades everywhere, flooding four floors. Workstations and equipment are damaged and a short-circuit occurs. Because COIN’s Telecom-By-Pass has been activated however, the Contact Centre agents can continue their work at the COIN recovery location. This makes possible correct call centre routing to the proper experts, makes their prompt systems available to them, and restores access to the wall-board for supervisors.

Supply chain as starting point for Business Continuity

To be able to deal with unexpected situations such as fire or power failure businesses these days are looking more often at continuity of the critical business processes. However, this is not always enough because a business is part of a supply chain and therefore has to deal with a range of suppliers, customers and dependencies.

Read more ...

Business Continuity Awareness week 2017

15 May to 19 May (inclusive) is Business Continuity Awareness Week (BCAW), during which specialists from the profession aim to raise awareness about the importance of business continuity.

Read more ...

 

Logo BusinessFriendOf KWF